pioneer-cemetery

The first person to settle in the Maryborough area arrived in 1842 but the first known burial in the area shown in these photographs did not take place until 1850 and the last took place during the 1870’s.

However burials could have started earlier than 1850 because there could be more than 150 pioneers buried in this area. No one knows exactly how many were buried here, there are no records of where the graves were located and no one knows the names of the people who lay in the graves that cannot be located.

Four graves have been identified and they belong to George Furber, his son-in-law Joseph Thomas Wilmshurst, Mrs W. Furber, William McAdam, Rose Hannah McAdam, Sarah Bridget Shea and Ann Teressa McAdam

George Furber was one of the earliest settlers in the Maryborough region and he and his son-in-law were building a house for the Wilmshurst family when they were killed by a group of Aborigines on December 3, 1855

Exactly who Mrs W. Furber was is not known for there are no records of anyone by that name living in the area. George Furber’s wife was Honoraria Furber and records show that she in this grave in 1850.

The earliest grave site was this one. Honoraria Furber was laid to rest here in 1850 and was joined by her husband and son-in-law in 1855

The earliest grave site was this one. Honoraria Furber was laid to rest here in 1850 and was joined by her husband and son-in-law in 1855

William McAdam was the first policeman appointed to Maryborough and he took up his post in January 1850.

These graves were all located adjacent to the earliest settlement and some of the locations of those original buildings have been identified.

These days this site is adjacent to a busy main road and yet it a walk over these grounds can be like stepping into another world. The sound of the traffic fades and all that remains is the sound of the breeze in the trees and the calls of the local bird life.

William McAdam's grave from 1860 is on the left while Sarah Bridget Shea's grave from 1851 is on the right.

William McAdam’s grave from 1860 is on the left while Sarah Bridget Shea’s grave from 1851 is on the right.